Sacraments - HOLY CROSS CHURCH CATFORD

HOLY CROSS CHURCH

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Holy Cross Church Catford
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They are celebrated on Sundays after the 11.30am Mass ,following participation in a preparation course
The next course will be confirmed in the newsletter
Baptism Form available here

Parents and GodParents wishing to have their children baptised will need to provide a copy of catholicity, e.g. Baptism Certificate, Confirmation Certificate, First Holy Communion Certificate and/or Catholic Marriage Certificate .

Prerequisites for Sponsors of Baptism (Canon 874)
...The Sponsor must:
  1. have completed their 16th year of age , unless the diocesan bishop has established another age, or the priest has granted an exception for a just cause.
  2. be a catholic who had been confirmed and has already received the most holy sacrament of The Eucharist and leads a life of faith in keeping with the function to be taken on.
  3. not be the father or mother of the one to be baptised.

§ A baptised person who belongs to a non-catholic ecclesial community is not to participate except together with a Catholic sponsor and then only as a witness of the baptism



The Sacramental Symbols of Baptism
  • Blessing and Invocation: The priest (or deacon) blesses the water using the sign of the cross. He invokes the Spirit of God to come onto the water and consecrate it. This makes it Holy so that the person being baptised will be; "born again of Water and the Spirit".

  • Profession of Faith: Baptism brings someone into the community of Christian People. We faithfully profess that we follow Christ by proclaiming the ancient Creed of the Church.

  • Baptism: The central and most important part of Baptism; Water. There is a threefold pouring over the person to be baptised in the name of the Holy Trinity; The Father, and the Son, and the Holy Spirit. The newly bapised in now purified, saved, delivered from evil, set free and belongs to God.

  • Anoiting: Oil is used to sweeten,to strenghen and to render supple. The Church uses consecrated oil for this same purpose in Baptism. The oil is consecrated each year by the Bishop at the Chrism Mass on Holy Thursday. The sign of the Cross is traced on the forehead of the newly baptised. They are now consecrated to the Lord.

  • White Garment: Being transformed through baptism, the White Garment is a sign of newness of life and being 'Clothed in Christ'.

  • Lighted Candle: During Baptisms, the Pschal Candle burns near the baptismal font. A symbols of the presence of the Risen Lord. A small candle is used to take a flame from the Paschal Candle and entrusted to the newly baptised person, through their godparents. As a community we pray the the flame of faith may be kept alive until the Lord comes again to call this and all children of light to join him and all the saints in his heavenly kingdom.

HOW TO REQUEST A BAPTISM CERTIFICATE

The parish office requires a week’s notice and a deposit of £5 cash for the above.
Information required is
·         Name of the child
·         Date of birth
·         Approximate date of Baptism
·         Contact details
Please download the form here and fill up or put the above information on a paper then deposit in an envelope marked ‘for the attention of Parish Admistrator and put through the letterbox of: 208 Sangley Rd during the weekends or deliver in person to the Parish office during office hours (Mon & Thurs 10am-12pm).
The deposit will be returned on collection or used to post the certificate if preferred. Please state your preference in the letter provided.


Children entering Year 3 of primary school will be eligible to receive Holy Communion for the first time next summer. It is the duty, and privilege, of parents to prepare their child for this important step, with the support of the Parish. To this end, there are regular sessions for the children together with their parents/carers, each month. In order to undertake this programme, it is important that you are prepared to make the following commitments:
·      You must attend the information meeting on Monday, 16th  September at 7.30pm,  
·      Attend all of the sessions together with your child
o  Please understand that missing sessions with no good reason will mean deferring your child’s First Holy Communion until next year
·      To attend Mass weekly, as a family.
·      To spend time regularly with your child, continuing on from the group sessions and working on the book at home.
·      Arrange an appointment to see Fr Antony before your child celebrates the Sacrament of Reconciliation in December

Please note that children should be prepared for their First Holy Communion in the parish where the family regularly worships.

During Mass on a weekend (to be arranged), you will be invited to stand up and make that commitment in the presence of the congregation.

If you feel that you as a family are ready for this solemn undertaking, then please fill in the attached registration form
and return it to the parish office by Monday, 9th  September at the latest with:
·      A copy of your child’s Baptism certificate
·      Payment of £25 (or part payment of £12.50) If this will cause you difficulty, please speak to Fr Antony in private



The Programme
The programme that we follow here at Holy Cross is called "I Belong" and it follows the structure of the Mass, from when we bless ourselves as we enter the church, until we are sent forth at the end of the Mass ‘…to love and to serve the Lord’.

Our first session, in September, looks back at our Baptism, which made us all members of the same family—that of the Church throughout the world.

From then until December we prepare for the children’s First Reconciliation, which takes place during Advent.

In January we begin by looking at the different parts which make up the Mass and why it is so important for us to gather as a congregation each week to share in the Eucharist.

There are four more sessions before First Communion at the end of May.
In June we gather for a final time to reflect on the fact that we have reached an important stage together, but it is not the end of the journey, and we are all sent out to show by our lives that we are true Christians.

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The children work, with their parents, in small groups with their own catechists. Over the course of the year each group will have their turn to prepare and read the Prayers of the Faithful (the Bidding Prayers) during Mass. This usually happens during the 10.00 am Mass on Sunday, please ensure that your child is there when it is their turn.

Please note that it is not possible to offer child care facilities during the First Communion sessions. Parents will need to make alternative arrangements for any younger children.

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In Catholic teaching, the Sacrament of Penance is the method of the Church by which individual men and women confess sins committed after baptism and have them absolved by God through the administration of a Priest. The Catholic rite, obligatory at least once a year for serious sin, is usually conducted within a confessional box, booth or reconciliation room. This sacrament is known by many names, including penance, reconciliation and confession (Catechism of the Catholic Church, Sections 1423-1442). While official Church publications usually refer to the sacrament as "Penance", "Reconciliation" or "Penance and Reconciliation", many laypeople continue to use the term "Confession" in reference to the Sacrament.
For the Catholic Church, the intent of this sacrament is to provide healing for the soul as well as to regain the grace of God, lost by sin. A perfect act of contrition, wherein the penitent expresses sorrow for having offended God and not out of fear of eternal punishment, even outside of confession removes the eternal punishment associated with mortal sin but a Catholic is obliged to confess his or her mortal sins at the earliest opportunity.[3] In theological terms, the priest acts in persona Christi and receives from the Church the power of jurisdiction over the penitent. The Council of Trent (Session Fourteen, Chapter I) quoted John 20:22-23 as the primary Scriptural proof for the doctrine concerning this sacrament, but Catholics also consider Matthew 9:2-8, 1 Corinthians 11:27, and Matthew 16:17-20 to be among the Scriptural bases for the sacrament.

The Catholic Church teaches that sacramental confession requires three "acts" on the part of the penitent: contrition (sorrow of the soul for the sins committed), disclosure of the sins (the 'confession'), and satisfaction (the 'penance', i.e. doing something to make amends for the sins).[4] The basic form of confession has not changed for centuries, although at one time confessions were made publicly.[5]
Typically, the penitent begins sacramental confession by saying, "Bless me Father, for I have sinned. It has been [time period] since my last confession." The penitent must then confess what he/she believes to be grave and mortal sins, in both kind and number,[6] in order to be reconciled with God and the Church. The sinner may also confess venial sins; this is especially recommended if the penitent has no mortal sins to confess. According to the Catechism, "without being strictly necessary, confession of everyday faults (venial sins) is nevertheless strongly recommended by the Church. Indeed the regular confession of our venial sins helps us form our conscience, fight against evil tendencies, let ourselves be healed by Christ and progress in the life of the Spirit. By receiving more frequently through this sacrament the gift of the Father's Mercy, we are spurred to be merciful as He is merciful".[7] "When Christ's faithful strive to confess all the sins that they can remember, they undoubtedly place all of them before the divine mercy for pardon."[8] As a result, if the confession was good, "the sacrament was valid" even the penitent inadvertently forgot some mortal sins, which are forgiven as well. As a safeguard not to become something like "subconsciously inadvertent" to avoid saying some sins, these must be confessed in the next confession (if the penitent then remembers them; or generally in the first confession in which they are remembered). Even then it is allowed, however allowed, and even, except for certain devotional purposes, generally sensible to concentrate in one's examination of conscience on the time since the last Confession

Are you in year 9, getting ready to take some of the biggest decisions in your life so far? What will you study? What do you want to do with your life? Then it's time to take the next step in your journey of Faith. Preparing for the Sacrament of Confirmation you will be able to take part more fully in the life of the Church through a series of service projects. You'll be able to learn more about yourself, about our saviour Jesus and about the Church we belong to. Most importantly you'll receive the Holy Spirit to strengthen and renew your commitment to set out on the Christian adventure.

The service projects start every year in October and the course runs from January to May every other Friday from 18:30 in Hartley Hall.
Application Forms are available from the church during a specified period which is published in the newsletter.







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The anointing of the sick is administered to bring spiritual and even physical strength during an illness, especially near the time of death. It is most likely one of the last sacraments one will receive. A sacrament is an outward sign established by Jesus Christ to confer inward grace. In more basic terms, it is a rite that is performed to convey God’s grace to the recipient, through the power of the Holy Spirit.

Like all the sacraments, Holy anointing was instituted by Jesus Christ during his earthly ministry. The Catechism explains, “This sacred anointing of the sick was instituted by Christ our Lord as a true and proper sacrament of the New Testament. It is alluded to indeed by Mark, but is recommended to the faithful and promulgated by James the apostle and brother of the Lord” (CCC 1511; Mark 6:13; Jas. 5:14-15).
The anointing of the sick conveys several graces and imparts gifts of strengthening in the Holy Spirit against anxiety, discouragement, and temptation, and conveys peace and fortitude (CCC 1520). These graces flow from the atoning death of Jesus Christ, for “this was to fulfill what was spoken by the prophet Isaiah, ‘He took our infirmities and bore our diseases’” (Matt. 8:17).




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